The Killing of a Sacred Deer to premiere in Prague’s Kino Svetozor

Be2Can distribution will host the premiere of the new Yorgos Lanthimos film The Killing of a Sacred Deer, starring Colin Farrell and Nicole Kidman, on November 1 in Prague's Kino Svetozor.

10 creepy Czech films to watch this Halloween

Despite not having a wide range of generic horror movies, and not being a country that traditionally celebrates Halloween, the Czech Republic's film industry is still known for its wholly original and bizarre taste in film and animation. From the influential and undeniably creepy animations of Karel Zeman and Jan Svankmajer to the philosophical and truly bizarre works in the Czech New Wave era of cinema, these titles will get you in the mood.

Bill Murray films in Prague’s Bio OKO – Ghostbusters, Groundhog Day and more

Bill Murray - actor, comedian, pop culture icon, and all-round good guy has probably been your favourite person at some point or another. From 24/10 - 29/10, Prague's Bio OKO will screen 9 carefully selected gems from the actor's rewarding film career, which has spanned over 40 years and seen collaboration with great directors like Wes Anderson, Jim Jarmusch, Sofia Coppola and more. Check out some of our recommendations below.

Be2Can 2017: You Were Never Really Here review – Joaquin Phoenix and a hammer

Lynne Ramsay's hallucinatory revenge drama seems like a quiet tribute to Taxi Driver, with a wonderfully raw and stripped down performance from Joaquin Phoenix. There's a welcoming focus on primitive emotion rather than balls-out action.

Be2Can 2017: The Killing of a Sacred Deer review – fantastic taboo horror

Currently screening at Prague's Be2Can, The Killing of a Sacred Deer is a wild, unconventional, and wholly unpredictable horror film with tremendous psychological depth, which somehow blends seamlessly with director Yorgos Lanthimos' signature quickfire wit and dialogue. 

Be2Can 2017: The Square review

The Square is a satirical take on the modern madness of the art industry. Packed with subtle nods to our doomed society, it makes for a deep post-viewing discussion. However, director Ruben Östlund gives a bit too much to ponder here, and that makes this Cannes Palme d'Or winner fall short.