Three Billboards review – Frances McDormand is mesmerising

Three Billboards is an absolute knockout. A well-balanced dramedy with a fierce and sometimes brutal sense of humour, and packed with powerhouse performances ruled by Frances McDormand, who's well on her way to Oscar glory.

Festival of Iranian Films 2018: Parting review

Parting cleverly tells a part of the refugee struggle that's not usually told. It's an informative look into the complicated and gruelling process of escaping one's own country, before even thinking about the perils that lay on the journey ahead.

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle review – entertaining, but nothing like the first

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle is your standard run-of-the-mill action/adventure film. Good for the school holidays, and good as a stand alone film. As a sequel though, it strays from the original.

Movie Barf’s Top 20 films of 2017

It's finally come. The end of another year of cinema. The end of another year of blogging about cinema. It's been a great year, with some surprising twists and turns for both independent and Hollywood cinema. 

Movie Barf’s Best Soundtracks of 2017

Along with the best films of the year, which is still undergoing some intense thought, come the best soundtracks. Being a massive soundtrack nerd, this was A LOT of fun to write. Keep in mind however, this is a list comprised of original scores from film and television series released in the Czech Republic during the year 2017. You won't find Baby Driver on this list, but give it a spin all the same. For those of you too impatient to read and who would rather get straight to the point, scroll down to check out my carefully selected 'Best of' Spotify playlist. Happy listening!

120 BPM review – the most authentic queer film in years

120 BPM or BPM (Beats Per Minute) is a non-traditional movie about HIV  in the sense that most of the film is spent in the heated debates of activist group ACT UP Paris, and when we finally see the searing physiological and psychological effects of the virus, it's brutal and unforgiving. This film doesn't hold back, and that's what puts it above the rest.